9 reasons why to love Argentine wines

1. Unique growing conditions

argArgentina is located in South America, right next to the Andes mountains which is the longest continental mountain range. Most of the wineries are located right next to the mountains where the land is extremely high, in Argentina you can find the highest vineyards in the world . The rainfall is extremely low because the rain cannot pass the mountains, so most of the water comes from the Andes as a melt water and from watering the plants. Wines have roots very deep to look for water and the water deeper in the earth contains more minerals. Anther important factor is the Sun, as the grapes get a lot of Sun the high altitude won’t make the wines to freeze. Also they grow thicker skin as a protection from all that intense sunlight, that again increases the grapes resistance to diseases and humidity.

2. Best Malbec in the world

malbecMalbec is from France but it got famous in Argentina. Main reason is because Argentina and France have a very different climate and the conditions. In France it rains more often and there is a lot less sunlight, so Malbec grew with thin skin and all that humidity caused the grape the have this garlic smell and flavor. So it didn’t gain popularity nor was known as an extraordinary wine. When it was brought to Argentina in 1868 by Michel Pouget it blossomed. Now it is number one grown grape in Argentina and you can find the greatest examples of Malbec from Mendoza. It is said that the original Malbec cannot be found in France anymore due to frost and phylloxera epidemic that devastated the country right after Malbec was brought to Argentine, to restore the Malbec in France the plants were brought to France from Argentina.

3. Many boutique wineries

cariWhy we should love boutique wineries? Because they have the good stuff! Many big wineries don’t care for old vineyards because the grapes in there produce very little wine what come to quantity and it takes a  lot of effort and simply is not that profitable for them. Small wineries take the best of those old vineyards, small grapes are more concentrated and have intense flavors which are great for reserve wines. For example small boutique winery called Carinae owens 3 hectares of 95 years old  Malbec in Luján de Cuyo, which is known as one of the best best for fine quality wines.

4. Great price

priceYou can find excellent wines that are inexpensive because the competition in very high and companies need to keep the price affordable. When being in Argentina it is wise to drink Argentine wines as to import things is very expensive and you probably end up paying 30 to 40% more than it should cost. Even in the restaurants where for a good bottle of wine you would have to pay quite a decent amount, in Argentina you can get something great with a fair price. What comes to buying wines abroad, since Argentina is fairly new in foreign markets they need to keep the price lower not because the wines are not good but because they need to introduce themselves to the market.

5. Strong in alcohol

wineThis is great because the quality is amazing, you shouldn’t be feeling the high alcohol that strong because the flavors are there and you don’t feel the alcohol. Be careful with how many glasses you consume!

 

6. Many old wineries

wine oldArgentina has been an active wine country for over 100 years so the wine tradition is very noticeable and important. Many old wineries have museums where you can see the story behind the wine. Often it is about a family from a European country like Italy, who immigrated to Argentina 100 years ago and brought their traditions to Argentina  and started their life in the New World.

7. Very interesting variety

torNext to Malbec you can find Bonarda, second most popular grape in Argentina, quite a secret grape of Argentina and probably in couple of years will gain more popularity in the rest of the world as well. Torrontes is a white wine and the only grape that is actually from Argentina, best examples come from Salta, north-west of the country. Apart from those grapes you can find Cabernet Sauvignon, Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Noir, Merlot, Syrah and many more. Be sure to try different blends as well!

8. High quality

qIn the past 20 years the quality has changed a lot, a lot of wine experts from all over the world were invited to Argentina to help the industry to improve. The results are visible and now you can see how old traditions and new technology are working side by side and the results are outstanding.

9. Help the economy 🙂

oneyThe world is in crisis but things are very bad in Argentina, so when you buy Argentine products you contribute to their economy!

 

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Yerba Mate

IM000952.JPGI have been living in Buenos Aires for 1,6 years now and I still haven’t grown to like mate. I don’t understand the big fuzz around it but I cannot deny how important it is to the people living here. It is truly a big part of Argentine culture. They even have an Insitute of Yerba Mate, according to them 98% of Argentine households have yerba mate in their home!

Mate is a traditional South American infused drink. It has a very high caffeine level so many Argentinians start their days with mate instead of coffee. Some time ago people thought it to have “mateine” instead of caffeine but was proven to be the same caffeine as you can find in tea, coffee and chocolate. Mate is also known for its digestive and purifying powers.

 
bombaMate is drunken with a special straw called bombilla which is made of silver, cheaper versions also from nickel silver o stainless steel. It has holes in the end to let the water through but not the yerba itself. Usually you can find ornaments or decorations to make the straw stand out. As mate is a drink to have with friends and family all together, the straw gets shared as well, that part may bother the most new drinkers.

 The cup is made from calabash gourd, newer versions also from rubber, plastic or glass. in Argentina they call the cup “mate” like the drink itself.

euroempiresMate was first consumed by Guarani people living in nowadays Brazil area which used to belong to Paraguay back then. On 16th century during the European colonization, when Spanish colony was in Paraguay drinking mate started to spread. In the mid 17th century Jesuits managed to domesticate the plant and made their own plantations in Misiones. By the year 1715 mate had spread all the way to Chile and Bolivia. British colonists in Chile took it from there to Europe and it was well accepted. Nowadays you can find mate in all over South America.

 How to make mate, step by step:

  1.  1. You need to have yerba mate, Mate the cup and bombilla.
  2. Fill the cup half full, place your hand one the cup and shake it. The idea of this is to get the powder off the yerba mate as it makes the drink bitter.
  3. Insert the bombilla into the cup and fill it with hot water, right temperature for the water is around 80 degrees Celsius (around 180 degrees Fahrenheit). Water level should be just enough to cover the yerba mate.
  4. Drink through the bombilla, if you want it sweeter then add sugar on your taste.
  5. When water ends just re-fill with the water and pass the cup around.
  6. When you feel the yerba mate is loosing its taste just replace the yerba mate and repeat the process.

It is important to know that the first round should be always drunken by the person who prepared it because it is like a quality control to makes sure that the drink is not too strong or bitter and then the next round will be passed around.

 You can couple of different kinds of mate:

  1. Sueve yerba mate – the taste is more mild and less bitter, tea is made from yerba mate leaves plus added branches of the plant
  2. Yerba mate – only leaves of the yerba mate is used, no other parts of the plant, more bitter and stronger
  3. Flavoured yerba mate- added flovour like orange, lemon, herbs, grapefruit
  4. Yerba mate with sugar already included
  5. Yerba mate in a tea bag

Yerba mate has some health benefits:

  1. Has a lot of antioxidants which help to prevent cardiovascular diseases because cholesterol and fat won’t accumulate in the arteries
  2. Helps to fasten metabolism

DYI Wine in Just Days!

Miracle-Machine

VIMEO, MIRACLE MACHINE

It’s true! It’s finally happened and after years of talks about how only the son of God can do it, now you can too. That’s right, I’m talking about turning water into wine. There’s no cellar, oak barrels or steel fermenting tanks required. For the low low price of just $499 the perfectly titled Miracle Machine accelerates the wine making process by adding a packet of premixed ingredients in order to create any style of wine you could possibly want in just three days. Just add water, download the phone app that goes with it and follow fermentation instructions there.

The product was created by Kevin Boyer and Philip James. The two, a Napa Valley sommelier and a wine website entrepreneur respectively, are claiming that with their new product you’ll be able to create a bottle of wine that would normally cost you upwards of $20 in for just a few dollars.

As of right now they have six styles of grapes that will be available for purchase including favorites such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. Within the next three months they’re hoping to add five to 10 more styles. Oh, but what about wines that have spent time in oak, there’s no way they’re going to be able to capture that flavor…you’re mistaken. There’s even a packet for that called their ‘finishing powder’. With this it can seem like your wine has been aging for as much as a year all within a matter of days!

Water Turning to Wine

But how does this work you ask? Well, unfortunately exactly how it works is being kept a secret (for obvious reasons). But we did find out that the chamber uses electrical sensors, transducers, heaters and pumps in order to control the inner environment for the two distinct fermentation stages.

If you’re looking to get even more scientific, a digital refractometer (whatever that is) measures the sugar content of the liquid during fermentation. A custom-designed ceramic air-diffuser then pumps filtered air under a regulated micro-oxygenated environment and aerates the wine to soften the tannins. All the while an ultrasonic transducer resonates under the chamber which is meant to speed up flavor development somehow.

One of the coolest parts of this whole thing is that it’s entirely controlled from your smartphone. How great is that?! No need to wait and wonder what’s happening as you can set up push notifications to know exactly what’s going on.

The only major downside to this product is that because it’s not produced under inert gas like a typical bottle of wine it will only keep for several weeks (which I would imagine for someone who invests in this little jewel won’t be a problem). The other downside is that as this is a Kickstarter project it still lacks the major funding needed in order to put into full on production.  

Mendoza, Argentina

 MendozaWhen you talk about wines from Argentina, without a doubt the region of Mendoza is going to come up. Mendoza is the most important wine region of Argentina considering that 75% of all Argentine wine is produced there.

Before the arrival of the Spanish conquistadors in the 1560’s Native American tribes such as the Puelche, Huarpe and Incas inhabited the area. Civilization in Mendoza dates back to 300 AD. These tribes developed the first irrigation system in this area in order to grow crops like potatoes and corn. The main tribe responsible is the Huarpe tribe. They arrived in	When you talk about wines from Argentina, without a doubt the region of Mendoza is going to come up.  Mendoza is the most important wine region of Argentina considering that 75% of all Argentine wine is produced there.   	Before the arrival of the Spanish conquistadors in the 1560's Native American tribes such as the Puelche, Huarpe and Incas inhabited the area.  Civilization in Mendoza dates back to 300 AD.  These tribes developed the first irrigation system in this area in order to grow crops like potatoes and corn.  The main tribe responsible is the Huarpe tribe.  They arrived in Mendoza in the mid 1400's.  It wasn't until 1561 when Pedro del Castillo came an conquered that area in the name of Spain founding the Mendoza that we know today.   	The Spaniards then copied the successful irrigation system that the Huarpe tribe had created and carried it all throughout Mendoza as well as the surrounding provinces.  Without this system the Spanish civilization wouldn't have been able to survive due to Mendoza's desert climate.  The colonization of Mendoza wasn't without its hardships.  Due to insufficient funds and labor shortages times were difficult.  Naturally in true conquest form the Spanish employed the Native Americas to do these jobs but later ousted them from their homelands to Chile and ended up using slaves of African decent instead.   	Slave labor immensely expanded Mendoza's agricultural reach.  By the 1700s Spaniards, or more accurately, the slaves, had built over 83 irrigation canals.  When their agricultural section began to flourish this led to large advances in trading as well.  The land became a large source for wine, olive oil, dried fruits and flour.  Naturally all of the property and items up for trade belonged to the Spanish government and therefore it was illegal for the town to trade on their own.  This was quite a nuisance and so General Jose de San Martin took it upon himself to  liberate not only Argentina (in 1817) but also Chile and Peru.   	Unfortunately for the citizens of Mendoza just a mere 44 years after their liberation a major earthquake took place killing over 5,000 people.  Along with the deaths came detrimental damage.  Fortunately the residents banned together to rebuild following a newer more urban design.  That meant bigger plazas and wider streets which quite distinct from the older Spanish-conquered cities such as Cordoba.   	As of 2010 the census stated the Mendoza's population is 115,041.  It's area is 54 kilometers squared which is about 21 miles.  There are five main plazas there: Plaza Independencia, Plaza San Martin, Plaza Chile, Plaza Italia and Plaza España.  The streets are set up in a grid pattern which make it very easy to navigate.  Today, Mendoza sees many tourists for the surrounding grape and olive vineyards in the area.   Mendoza in the mid 1400’s. It wasn’t until 1561 when Pedro del Castillo came an conquered that area in the name of Spain founding the Mendoza that we know today.

The Spaniards then copied the successful irrigation system that the Huarpe tribe had created and carried it all throughout Mendoza as well as the surrounding provinces. Without this system the Spanish civilization wouldn’t have been able to survive due to Mendoza’s desert climate. The colonization of Mendoza wasn’t without its hardships. Due to insufficient funds and labor shortages times were difficult. Naturally in true conquest form the Spanish employed the Native Americans to do these jobs but later ousted them from their homelands to Chile and ended up using slaves of African decent instead. 

Plaza in MendozaSlave labor immensely expanded Mendoza’s agricultural reach. By the 1700s Spaniards, or more accurately, the slaves, had built over 83 irrigation canals. When their agricultural section began to flourish this led to large advances in trading as well. The land became a large source for wine, olive oil, dried fruits and flour. Naturally all of the property and items up for trade belonged to the Spanish government and therefore it was illegal for the town to trade on their own. This was quite a nuisance and so General Jose de San Martin took it upon himself to liberate not only Argentina (in 1817) but also Chile and Peru.

Unfortunately for the citizens of Mendoza just a mere 44 years after their liberation a major earthquake took place killing over 5,000 people. Along with the deaths came detrimental damage. Fortunately the residents banned together to rebuild following a newer more urban design. That meant bigger plazas and wider streets which quite distinct from the older Spanish-conquered cities such as Cordoba.

Plaza in Mendoza

As of 2010 the census stated the Mendoza’s population is 115,041. It’s area is 54 kilometers squared which is about 21 miles. There are five main plazas there: Plaza Independencia, Plaza San Martin, Plaza Chile, Plaza Italia and Plaza España. The streets are set up in a grid pattern which make it very easy to navigate. Today, Mendoza sees many tourists for the surrounding grape and olive vineyards in the area.  

Common Wine Myths Revealed

As with most things, after years of existence rumors and myths begin to spread and these are typically the topics that take off like wild fire. The same is true for wine. Today I’d like to clear up some common myths about wine that have been puzzling people for awhile now.

wine-bottle-screw-tops

1. Screw Tops Equate to Lower Quality Wines

While this may have been true to an extent in the past, it is not so much the case anymore. More and more studies are being done to prove that screw caps      are just as effective as corks in a bottle. Besides this storing an opened bottle of wine has become much simpler thanks to the screw cap. There’s no more need to partially lean the bottle to the side in your fridge door because the cork sticks out just a little too much to fit perfectly.

the-most-expensive-wines-in-the-world

2. Expensive Wines are always Better

Under normal circumstances it’s perfectly understandable that one would think that the finer things most often come at a higher cost to the consumer. Taking the examples of buying shoes or cars or houses, price and quality tend to be directly related. However, this isn’t always the case with wine. Sometimes you just need to know where to look to get the really good stuff for really cheap. In reference to wine specifically, the pricier bottles are most often meant for storage in a valuable wine collection as opposed to being purchased for an after work glass of wine on a Tuesday. Nowadays about 90% of wine is meant to be drunk young. What this means is that you no longer should feel obligated to buy that fancy bottle locked in a glass case in order to enjoy a good wine. My suggestion would be to pick a wine that comes from a small production winery. While there is never a guarantee, you will most likely get a nice quality wine and quite often at a lower cost. Another option would be to move here to Argentina where the wine is plentiful and the price is pleasing to the pocket.

old dusty wine bottle

3. Old Wines are Better than Young Ones.

If you’re a fan of the show Frasier I hate to break your heart but while the two bothers do know a lot about wine and they have excellent taste, they’re a bit snobby. That practically priceless bottle of French wine they got there hands on was probably delicious but in general, most wines are meant to be drunk young. After about 5-7 years they’ve really reached their maximum potential and the quality will in fact go down after that. Deeper reds tend to have higher aging potential than the more fruity wines but still buy the bottle to enjoy how it tastes, not how it looks.

wine food pairing chart

4. Red Wine with Meat, White Wine with Fish

Ok, this one actually is kind of true. As far as food pairing is concerned it’s important to match notes and weight. Weight refers to the feel of the wind in your mouth and this can vary from light-bodied to full bodied. Notes refer to the flavors and smells the wine evokes. What you need to keep in consideration with this is that wine is a very personal thing. While some people might really like one combination others might prefer something else. Don’t be afraid to do some experimentation with this.

person tasting wine

5. Critics are the End All Be All When it Comes to Wine

Like I said before, wine preference is a very personal thing. Each individual will never taste or smell exactly what someone else is tasting or smelling. Basically, it’s up to you to decide what you do and don’t like. Critics of course have their own opinion and typically that’s driven by lots of personal and professional experience. However, it’s still just their own personal take on a wine.

chilling bottle of syrah

6. Red Wines Should Not be Chilled

This isn’t true. Of course you don’t want to serve a red chilled like a white wine but popping it in the fridge for a few minutes just before serving will help to develop the flavors of the wine a bit. White wines should be served chilled and taken out of the refrigerator a few minutes before serving.  

How to Store Wines

argentina_wine_map

 So you’ve gone to a wine tasting in Buenos Aires and you’ve decided to have one (if not two!) cases of delicious Argentine wine shipped back to your house, here’s the dilemma: how do you store them? I’m here to help! In the following post you will find a list of do’s and don’t for how you can and should properly store your wine so when you go to open that beautiful bottle of Malbec directly from Argentina you’re met with a pleasantly fruity and deliciously balance flavor as opposed to something not so polite.

For starters we recommend that you KEEP IT COOL! When it comes to wine heat is your number one enemy. Anything that is over 70 degrees Fahrenheit will quickly age your wine, which can be quite undesirable. If exposed to anything higher than this your wine will actually get cooked, another quick way to ruin your precious wine. Ideally the temperature range should be between 45 and 65 degrees Fahrenheit. Now some will tell you that there is a perfect temperature but there’s really no exact science to this so it’s nothing to fret over too much.

Having said this make sure that you DON’T KEEP IT TOO COOL! Wine banished to the fridge will only last temporarily and the lack of moisture could potentially dry out your wine cork letting air seep into the bottle damaging your wine. Also, don’t keep your wine in the freezer for too long. As I found out the hard way, wine is not like a spirit in that it won’t freeze. The liquid will start to expand and you may end up picking out pieces of glass from your freezer if you forget that you put that white in there to cool down for your dinner party.

wine serving temp

What’s most important for wines is that the temperature is kept consistent. Extreme or frequent temperature swings are what are most liable to damage your wine. It’s also a good idea to keep the wine away from sunlight as UV rays can degrade and prematurely age the product. This is actually why wine bottles are colored, like sunglasses for your wine if you will.

And what about storing the bottles on their sides? With alternative closures such as screw caps and plastic corks it’s not really necessary seeing as the idea of turning a wine bottle on its side is to prevent the cork from drying out. If you’re planning on drinking your bottle in the near future it is also not a big deal if you keep your wines standing up. Horizontal racking is definitely a very efficient way to store you bottles though.

wine cellar Wine Cooler-closed

Now that we’ve answered the how we need to answer the where. If you aren’t lucky enough to have an underground wine cellar or even a cool not-overly damp basement you can find a safe place out of the way to store your bottles in your home. As a rule of thumb the kitchen, laundry room and obviously boiler room because these places can all get too hot. A location not directly in line with light from a window or a small wine cooler would be a good idea. The real advice I have for you is whatever number you’re thinking for bottle capacity, double it. When it comes to accumulating wine it tends to turn into an addictive habit!

How Long Can You Keep Red Wine For?

Aging (or ageing) properties have been known as far back as the Ancient Greeks and Romans. However, after the fall of the Roman Empire, the trend to age wine was generally discontinued. Most wines produced in Northern Europe were light bodied, pale colored and low in alcohol.

Roman Wine Aging Vessels

Although many follow the cliche that a wine improves with time, this is only true depending on a variety of factors. French Bordeaux wines such as Sauternes are known to be able to age up to 35 years. However, master of wine Jancis Robinson commented that only around the top 10% of all red wine and top 5% of whites can improve significantly enough to make drinking more enjoyable at 5 years of age than at 1 year of age.

wine_final6


The first factor that affects how a wine can age, is the grape and the terroir. A wine is given its aging properties from the phenols, or tannins, that come from that skin, leaves and stem of the grape. These acidic preservatives are important to the long-term maturing of the wine.  This is why white wines do not age well as the skins have been removed in the making. Over time, the tannins will precipitate out of the wine becoming sediment in the bottle, making the flavor and acidity well balanced.

wine aging barrels

Wines with high levels of tannins include Cabernet Sauvignon, Nebbiolo and Syrah. The Tignanello from Italy is a blend of Sangiovese, Cabernet Sauvignon and Cabernet franc – all tannic wines with high aging potential.  More wines with aging potential include Chardonnay,  Riesling, Pinot Noir and Zinfandel.

aging wine

Another big factor in aging wine is how it is kept. If not kept in a consistently dark, cool place such as a cellar, it is much more likely to go bad in a shorter period of time. It has also been said that the shape of the bottle can alter the aging time too.

Wine Aging Cartoon


Interestingly, Matt Kramer wrote two online articles including comments on aging wine. In his first article he basically concludes that any good red wine should be aged 10 years at least. He states ‘And that after 10 years of age in a cool spot, nearly all fine wines can give you the best of both worlds: a still-youthful fruitiness and the greater dimensionality of flavor that only age can offer.’ In the second article this opinion is reversed to  ‘There are some, such as as German and Alsatian Rieslings, Napa Valley Cabernets and Hungarian Tokajis, reward aging. But the majority of wines that are made now would only benefit from a maximum of 5 years.The bottom line: Today’s wines are far more drinkable, far more gratifying, far more rewarding when drunk younger than their counterparts of 20 years ago.’

Can three years offer that much of a difference in wine production or is this just being self-contradictory? Probably a bit self-contradictory, but it is true that wine production methods have changed over time, meaning tannin levels are lower.

To sum it up briefly, aging wine is sometimes beneficial, but not necessary. 

Argentine Asado

Difference between American beef cuts and Argentine Beef cuts

 

If any of you have ever lived in, been to or at least heard about Argentina, you will be aware of the famously high quality steak. The cuts are slightly different to what you will come across in your favourite BBQ house in the States! And although the quality of the meat may not differ too much from meat of a Texan BBQ, but Argentines really have it down to a T the art of how to grill and salt a steak.

Steak House in the USA

A classic style steak house in the United States can’t be beaten by much. But if you should come down to Argentina, getting to a parilla out of the city or even a parrilla in the city is a must do.

La Cabrera is a well known ‘parrilla’or BBQ joint in Buenos Aires.

Below is a picture highlighting the cuts of beef used generally in the US and other regions such as the UK.

As you can see, the area around the neck is divided into more parts.

The five different types of steaks you will see here are Bife de lomo (tenderloin). Entrana (skirt steak), Asado de tira (short ribs), Vacio (flank steak) and Bife de chorizo (sirloin).

 

The bife de Lomo is the most expensive cut, it’s big, tender and juicy. Lomo is a must try at least once, but can often lack a bit of flavour. Due to the lack of fat lines running through the meat it can often lack a bit of flavour.

La Entraña

The Entrana is not as large as lomo or bife de chorizo, so is a great choice if you don’t think you’ll finish off a larger option. This is a favourite among the Argentines and is a more flavourful, thinner cut of meat. Not the most tender of cuts, between a lomo and a matambre.

The Asado de tira, or ribs, is where you will also see another main difference to the states. In Argentina, the ribs are cut a lot shorter. They are packed full with flavour and are nice and crispy.

The Vacio, or flank steak, probably won’t be found outside of Argentina/Uruguay. This cut will have a coating of fat on the outside, but none on the inside. When cooked to perfection the fat goes crispy and keeps the inside tender and juicy.

The Bife de Chorizo is big a juicy with tasty exterior fat. Just make sure you get it in a good place. as a cheap Bife de Chorizo will be fatty and not so worth it.

A Matambre is another Argentine meat that is popular in Argentina. However is renowned for it’s toughness. So get your jaw prepared!

Although many things have been hit by the economic situation in the country, a benefit of eating out in Argentina is the value for money.

Barrios in Buenos Aires

Buenos Aires is made up of neighbourhoods, or ‘barrios’ as you’ll hear them being called here. The different neighbourhoods in Buenos Aires consist of:

Almagro,

Balvanera

Agronomia

Barracas

Belgrano

Boedo

Caballito

Chacarita

Coghlan

Colegiales

Constitucion

Flores

Floresta

La Boca

La Paternal

Liniers

Mataderos

Monte Castro

Montserrat

Nueva Pompeya

Nunez

Palermo

Parque Avellaneda

Parque Chacabuco

Parque Chas

Parque Patricios

Puerto Madero

Recoleta

Retiro

Saavedra

San Cristobal

San Nicolas

San Telmo

Velez Sarsfield

Versalles

Villa Crespo

Villa del Parque

Villa Devoto

Villa Luro

Villa General Mitre

Villa Lugano

Villa Ortuzar

Villa Pueyrredon

Villa Real

Villa Reachuelo

Villa Santa Rita

Villa Soldati

Villa Urquiza

 

Many of them are more well known than others. If you’re living in Buenos Aires, you’ve most likely heard of many. But coming in from abroad, it’s understandable that you may not know too much about them. rest assured that upon arrival in Buenos Aires you will soon be aware of the classic places to visit.

The crest of Palermo

Although each neighbourhood offers it’s own unique and beautiful story, the ones you will just have to visit include: San Telmo, Palermo, La Boca, Belgrano, Caballlito and Puerto Madero.

La Boca

La Boca became famous as the place of arrival of the inmirgants. It is home to the La Boca football ground or ‘bombonera’, along with the colourful walkways. Here you can buy trinkets to take home, or watch an outdoor tango show.

 

San Telmo

San Telmo is an old, classic and traditional neighbourhood in Buenos Aires full to the brim with history, tango, wine, parrillas and colours. Pop down on a Sunday to catch the San Telmo Market.

The great online newspaper The Argentina Independent  usually has stories and tips regarding the historic parts of San Telmo.

 

http://www.buenosaires.gob.ar/ciudad-de-buenos-aires/barrios

 

Palermo

Palermo has now because one of the most fashionable areas of Buenos Aires. Full of life and young people going out until 7am the next morning. You may hear people differentiating between the different parts of the area with ‘Palermo Soho, Alto Palermo’ and ‘Palermo Viejo’.

 

Take a walk around the parks or maybe Plaza Serrano and you can find yourself trying a steak or maybe tasting some wine.

 

Puerto Madero

Puerto Madero is probably known as the most modern and cleanest part of the city. Constructed by Roca (ex president), it has now become a classy place to stroll around, have dinner, go for a run, or book a night in a hotel.

Malbec-Bonarda Blend

Mixing two varieties together is often a great idea to help balance out tannins or flavor, and acquire a result desired by the winemaker. Luckily, Argentina has two staple varietals that are not only great on their own, but go smoothly together to make a perfect mix.

The Bonarda is somewhat of a hidden jem in Argentina. It is actually the second most produced varietal after the Malbec and can often be known in other regions of the world as ‘Charbono’. The Bonarda adds an aromatic touch and lifts the weightier Malbec. The Malbec is the most famous, classic argentine wine and grown at a lower altitude.

 

A great Malbec-Bonarda blend, like many argentine wines and most wines produced nowadays, is made to be drunk young – not aging more than a few years.

 

Being an Argentine produced wine, it’s no surprise to know that most exported Bonarda-Malbec blends are generally from the Mendoza region. Argentina is very fortunate as it’s terroir conditions really allow for the production of great wines.

The color of a Malbec-Bonarda blend could be noted as being a rich, deep ruby red and purple, A great Malbec-Bonarda blend is the Mairena Reserva Malbec Bonarda Blend from the Familia Blanco.   This varietal es 70% Malbec and 30% Bonarda with twelve months in French Oak and 13.6% alcohol content. With this wine you may be able to pick up on aromas of red fruit, cherries and plums (from the Malbec) and notes of Blackberries and raspberries from the Bonarda. The two combined give us a full bodied complex, pleasant and well balanced wine with a touch of sweetness and mild tannins.

A great pairing for this wine would be a nice steak (try it Argentine style!), roasted lamb and stews.